American Birding Association Birding Magazine Article Dec 2015

American Birding Association Birding Magazine Article Dec 2015

In the December 2015 American Birding Association magazine “Birding” I was mentioned in an article on page 8 called “ABA’s Young Birders: The Future is now” as I entered the ABA Young Birder of the Year competition 2015.

I was also mentioned in the birding milestones section on page 10 about be seeing my 4000th bird in the world and with a photo of my 4000th bird on the contents page (page 5)  http://bit.ly/1S2W7SC

Red-throated Tit, my 4000th bird in the world.

 

Young Birder Birdgirl Mya-Rose Craig taking a photo of a Red-throated Tit, Kenya
Photograph taken by and copyright Helena Craig

 

Red-throated Tit, Swaro Plains, Kenya
Photograph taken by and copyright Young Birder Birdgirl Mya-Rose Craig

 

Also on the Audubon Magazine website, there is an article about me, which I am very proud of:

https://www.audubon.org/news/the-little-twitcher-who-could

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Sexism in nature conservation – Part 2

Sexism in nature conservation – Part 2

Since I wrote my first blog post on 2nd December 2015 http://birdgirluk.blogspot.co.uk/2015/12/letter-to-bbc-wildlife-magazine-on.html, I have had lots of support. I really appreciate all of this; on Facebook Groups, my Facebook Page, Twitter and comments on my Blog.

Some of the advice has been given with really good intentions but without a real understanding of the issues for girls like me. Some people said that I should just appreciate how lucky I am to go on great birding trips (which I do), I should not worry about getting recognition (even though I only want recognition for what I and other girls achieve), I should stop blogging or having a presence on social media as that will stop the bullying (the bullying started way before I started my blog), that if I stopped trying to engage with people I would no longer feel let down and everything will be OK. So basically all these problems have happened because I tried to have a public profile and brought it upon myself. I think this is genuinely what a lot of birders think, believing that they have a modern outlook.

Some people did say “bullying is bad” but didn’t actually say “I’m sorry that happened to you” before being critical. Someone went further to tweet that the young birders group which they were a member was not involved. Despite messaging to say this was not true she didn’t correct herself. If someone doesn’t want to support me, unless are being rude to me, I don’t care. But do I have to ignore things that are untrue?

Young Birder Birdgirl Mya-Rose Craig birding in Somerset
Photograph taken by and copyright Helena Craig

Sometimes I do think about stopping it all, but I realise that all the backlash will carry on even if I stopped birding, ringing, talks, conservation projects, blogging and my social media accounts. Then all that would happen is that all these people (as women can be sexist too) would be saying “I told you she wasn’t really interested in birding, it was her parents forcing birding on her and I knew she would stop in her teens”.

The 50 were chosen by the magazine’s advisory panel of 30 middle-aged men (or older) and 2 women (again older) and ‘other’ experts. I would like to know who the other experts were and whether there were more men than women. The result was that only 12 out of 50 chosen were women, with 2 out of the top 10 being women. Jane Goodall was number one, but no one can argue with that? How can that be accurate, with so many women involved in the conservation sector? Was the outcome because it was men who voted or was it because women are not recognised for what they do? Maybe because they don’t shout about what they are doing as much as men? I think next time, they could try to focus on coming up with female names, who are as good and powerful as the men.

This month Birdwatching Magazine featured an article “Bird Watching, The Next Generation – Meet the young birders making a difference” which was in conjunction with the BTO. On the front page was a teenage girl looking through a telescope, which looked promising. First a 4 page article by 24 year old wildlife photographer Luke Massey on a trip back to his roots in France.

Then a 6 page article from the BTO’s Ieuan Evans on how young birders can get involved with BTO and other projects (great, I have been ringing and doing nest box surveys for 4 over years). On page 1 was a photo of a girl ringing and on page 6 one of a young boy birding. It’s good to have the photo of a girl but it would have much better if a woman from the BTO had written the piece. The BTO has lots of capable women.

Then a ½ page article by Findley Wilde age 13 year old on his concerns on conservation.

Then finally, a 4 page article by Nicola Boulton about working as a wildlife guide and photographer in Western Scotland.

So of the articles, 1 out of 4 are written by a woman. It was good that there were two photos of girls birding and ringing but this is bit shallow if they are not given the chance to write.

Then there are a number of young people, under the heading “One to Watch”. I know most of them and they are great birders in influential in our field. I am not saying that they didn’t deserve to be listed but I don’t think they are the only possible people that could have been included in this category. There was only 1 girl out of 7 people. This is my main issue. Were these people chosen by the BTO or the magazine? There are lots of amazing young female birders/ringers out there and I think this was a missed opportunity to showcase more of them. I know from Twitter that the magazine certainly was told about lots of them.

 

Sorrell Lyall,  Nathan Burch,  Alex White, Birdgirl Mya-Rose Craig, Billy Stockwell
at The Wildlife Trusts Every Child Wild Podcast on how to get young people into nature

Photograph taken by and copyright Helena Craig

Additional comments
There are situations where even if there isn’t
actual sexism, there is an inequality between men and women in birding and nature
conservation.
Are the number of women who come into our field
impacted by the fact that it appears to be dominated by men?
Would there be more women taking up the hobby, if
women were more visible?

Birdwatch Magazine Birders’ Choice Awards 2015
Again I personally have a good relationship with the magazine and so my comments are not meant to be taken personally by them or anyone who won.


Birdwatch Magazine announced their awards in October 2015 and anyone could vote online.
Four categories were for people:

Conservation hero of the year – Choice of 5/5 men
Local hero – to be nominated by voters
Blog of the year – Choice of 4 men/2 women
Best Book – Choice of 4 men/2 women

Results were announced on 27/12/15, with all the winners being male, who I am not at all disputing their winning.

Conservation Hero – Chris Packham, winning outright
Local hero – Nominated by readers, the
magazine highlighted 11 men/2 women, with the winner being a man
Blog of the year – Mark Avery, winning outright with a woman second (me!)
Book – Martin Garner, which was particularly lovely as he died not long afterwards

Why are those at the top dominated by men? Is it because there aren’t enough women, so they don’t get to the top or is it because men are promoted more than women? Particularly our female nature presenters? Where are they? Where are my role models? Where are my mentors?

Our nature media has to be more inclusive and balanced, publishing writing from men and women and be ethnically diverse where possible. Following my approach to the 4 big NGO’s on the issue of ethnic diversity, the RSPB and The Wildlife Trusts have been using images of ethnic minority children and young people. This is something the nature magazines need to focus on as well.

I hope the next time articles like this are written, women are fairly recognised and represented.

Young Birder Birdgirl Mya-Rose Craig birding in Somerset
Photograph taken by and copyright Helena Craig

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BBC Wildlife Magazine Young Blogger of the Year

BBC Wildlife Magazine Young Blogger of the Year

 

Birdgirl Mya-Rose Craig at Mabamba Wetlands, Uganda
Photograph taken by and copyright Helena Craig

 

During 2015, I decided that as well as blogging on my blog, I would also post on the BBC Wildlife Magazine blog, in the Local Patch Section http://bit.ly/1QufmKe. This actually was very time consuming but worthwhile just to be involved.

In early March 2015, I was blogger of the week with my post about surveying Spoon-billed Sandpiper in Bangladesh, which is a critically endangered bird that was down to 200 pairs in the world.

In the summer, BBC Wildlife Magazine announced that they would be giving awards, including one for Young Blogger of the Year.  They did not announce the winners until their January 2016 magazine.

 

BBC Wildlife Magazine Blogger of the year awards

 

In the young Blogger Section, Zach won, who blogged every day for a year.  However, I was really pleased to be announced as highly commended in that category, which was amazing.


BBC Wildlife Magazine Blogger of the year awards

 

Over the year January to December 2015, I posted 270 times on the BBC Wildlife Magazine local patch reporter blog and had 51,940 views on my posts.  Both were the highest of any blogger.  So thank you to all my followers and the people who read my posts.

 

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Association of Science Educators Conference 2016

Association of Science Educators Conference 2016

On 9th January 2016, not long after returned from Antarctica, I gave a 45 minute talk at the Association of Science Educators (ASE) Conference. The Association is for Science teachers and I talked about “Educating our Future Environmentalists”. The conference was at Birmingham University which was beautiful.

I contacted the Association last year and asked if I could speak at their annual conference about how they, as science teachers, could help to educate my generation about important environmental issues so that they care and want to make a change. The conference was huge with over 4,000 people attending. With lots of talks and workshops on at the same time, it was great to have a lecture room with lots of teachers coming to listen.

I wanted to get across that there was plenty that they could talk about without nature and conservation being added to the curriculum.

The first thing I talked about was the need to teach everyone about British nature so that we know five common birds, trees, animals, pollinators, insects and habitats as well as what issues are impacting them.

It was the first time I talked to teachers, which was quite daunting and a note to myself is that science teachers don’t seem to have a sense of humour like mine back at Chew Valley School.

I talked about teaching about palm oil plantations, cattle ranching as reasons for deforestation other than just logging.

I talked about endangered animals that teenagers might be moved by and conservation projects that I have come across that have been successful like the Yellow-throated Picathartes project in Ghana. I also talked about one amazing woman from the Bolivian Amazon who left to get an education but returned to persuade her community to build a lodge and say no to a logging contract.

I also talked about the issues that affect us in the UK like Fracking, GMOs, TTIP, habitat loss as well as pesticides and their effect on bees.

The teachers responded really well to my talk and it was interesting to talk to a lady who worked with headteachers in London and who my Mum knew from years ago. Her name is Yeasmin Chowdhury and she lives in Plaistow in London if anyone knows her and can get her in touch. She was really supportive of me, which was really kind.

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